Teachers:
Lee King (ICT Specialist) - Project Reflection
Jen Dynan (Grade 2 Teacher) - Project Reflection
Jacqueline Griffeth (Teacher Librarian) - Project Reflection
FUSE Link: Teacher Reflection

Learning Activity Overview


Book Reviews
The unit of work began in the Grade 5 library sessions, with a discussion about how the children decided what to read next, how they found out about good books to try and what made them want to read something.
The unit of work began in the Grade 5 library sessions, with a discussion about how the children decided what to read next, how they found out about good books to try and what made them want to read something. In previous years I have surveyed the Grade 6 children and noticed that peer recommendation was very powerful, so we looked at student book reviews in Challenge and Explore magazines and talked about which reviews caught their interest and analysed what it was about the reviews that persuaded them to try a particular book or series. We also examined the features of a book review and noted that two extremely important pieces of information were the title and the author of a book or series. It was also noticed that while an outline of the plot was provided, the ending was withheld and frequently the writer left the reader in suspense. The age and gender of the reviewer was also of some importance in convincing the reader that a book might match their interests.

VELS details.....

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Tools Used



Student Work


Cedric's Xtranormal Work


Xtranormal Book Review



Xtranormal HowTo



Reflection



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Jordan's Xtranormal Work


Xtranormal Book Review



Jordan Xtranormal HowTo



Jordan Project Reflection



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Kate's Zooburst Book Review


HowTo use ZooBurst



Kate's Project Reflection



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Liam's Fodey Book Review


Liam's Fodey Review


Fodey HowTo



Liam's Project Reflection



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Dom's Glogster Work


Glogster Book Review



Glogster HowTo



Dom's Glogster Reflection



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Alex Fodey Book Review


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Nicholas Fodey Book Review


Fodey Book Review by Nicholas



Nicholas Project Reflection



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Jonty's Fodey Book Review


Fodey Book review



Jonty Fodey HowTo



Jonty's Reflection



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Ami Glogster Book Review

Glogster Review



Glogster HowTo Video



Ami's Reflection on the Project



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Learning Activities Overview - continued

Grade 5 Library – Book Reviews

The unit of work began in the Grade 5 library sessions, with a discussion about how the children decided what to read next, how they found out about good books to try and what made them want to read something. In previous years I have surveyed the Grade 6 children and noticed that peer recommendation was very powerful, so we looked at student book reviews in Challenge and Explore magazines and talked about which reviews caught their interest and analysed what it was about the reviews that persuaded them to try a particular book or series. We also examined the features of a book review and noted that two extremely important pieces of information were the title and the author of a book or series. It was also noticed that while an outline of the plot was provided, the ending was withheld and frequently the writer left the reader in suspense. The age and gender of the reviewer was also of some importance in convincing the reader that a book might match their interests.

Next the children had to decide which book to promote. We discussed the purpose of these reviews, which was not to criticise the book, or merely report on it, but to persuade other students to give it a go. They were to think of a book they had genuinely enjoyed, which would probably have been read this year, but not necessarily. This enabled students who read few books to choose perhaps a picture book they enjoyed when they were younger. The book could be fiction or non-fiction, and not necessarily from our school library.

Next they wrote and edited their drafts, at which time we discussed the sort of persuasive language and catchy beginnings that might capture attention. We also viewed two or three Vokis produced by Grade 6 students as examples, and noted the greater persuasiveness of the student’s real voice compared to a computer generated one, and what aspects of the ‘oral performance’ enhanced the review.

Before beginning their Vokis, the children had to read their reviews aloud to me or to a classmate, concentrating on fluency and expression and noting any tricky words or ‘clunky’ sentences. After attending to these, they followed the instructions on a ‘how to’ card and created their Vokis. (At this stage we didn’t have the WEE Project ‘How To’s’ to view). This is where the WEE group experts came into their own, and there was a lot of troubleshooting and problem-solving happening as the work progressed. I noticed students worked very hard to perfect their audio recording, and engagement with the Voki creation was such that on two occasions, the bell rang and students had to be tapped on the shoulder and encouraged to go home!

The Vokis are copied on to our new library blog when finished, and all heads turn whenever we play one in the library. The use of ICT certainly increased engagement, more particularly amongst students who would not normally jump at the opportunity to produce a written book review. I also noticed, interestingly, that several reviews which were not especially well written were enhanced remarkably when recorded with expression, conviction and enthusiasm in the student’s voice. This was interesting as it gave students another way to shine.

English Level 4 (Years 5 and 6)

Learning focus
As students work towards the achievement of Level 4 standards in English, they consolidate and build on their foundational learning in English related to texts and language.
Students compose, comprehend and respond to an expanding range of texts in print and audiovisual and electronic forms that contain increasingly unfamiliar concepts, themes, information and issues. With guidance, they reflect on reading, viewing, writing, speaking and listening in ways that develop considered and critical approaches to a range of texts. These include extended literary texts such as novels, short stories, poetry and non-fiction; everyday texts; and media texts including newspapers, film and websites.
Students explore the relationship between the purpose and audience of texts and their structures and features, for example: sentence and paragraph structure, grammar, figurative language and organising structures in print texts; features of visual texts; and sound effects, characterisation and camera angles used in film. They develop their knowledge of how texts are constructed for particular purposes, and examine and challenge generalisations and simplistic portrayals of people and social and cultural issues. They learn how to draw evidence from texts to support their points of view. They experiment with several strategies when interpreting texts containing some unfamiliar ideas and information, for example, reading on, using diagrams, and differentiating between statements of fact or opinion.
Students write texts for a range of purposes that demonstrate their developing understanding of the way imagery, characterisation, dialogue, point of view, plot and setting contribute to the meaning of written and multimodal texts. They use this reflection, and their developing knowledge of the generic structures of different types of texts (such as narratives, reports and arguments), as the basis for composing an increasing range of written and spoken texts. Students become more systematic in their use of strategies for writing (including note-making, using models, planning, editing and proofreading) and make decisions about appropriate structures and features of language in texts for different purposes and audiences. They develop terminology or metalanguage to talk about and describe particular structures and features of language. They develop a multi-strategy approach to spelling, applying morphemic knowledge and an understanding of visual and phonic patterns, and select vocabulary for precise meaning.
Students engage in exploratory talk to share and clarify their ideas, to formulate simple arguments and to seek the opinions of others. They participate in oral interactions for different purposes, including entertaining, informing and influencing others. Students learn to sustain a point of view, and provide succinct accounts of personal experiences or events.
They experiment with spoken language features such as pace, pitch and pronunciation to enhance meaning as they plan, rehearse and reflect on their presentations. They build their capacity to combine verbal and visual elements in texts to communicate ideas and information by using, for example, presentation software or overheads.
When listening, students practise identifying the main idea and supporting details of spoken texts and summarising them for others. They begin to identify opinions offered by others, propose other viewpoints, and extend ideas in a constructive manner.


English - Level 4
Learning focus
As students work towards the achievement of Level 4 standards in English, they consolidate and build on their foundational learning in English related to texts and language.
Students compose, comprehend and respond to an expanding range of texts in print and audiovisual and electronic forms that contain increasingly unfamiliar concepts, themes, information and issues. With guidance, they reflect on reading, viewing, writing, speaking and listening in ways that develop considered and critical approaches to a range of texts. These include extended literary texts such as novels, short stories, poetry and non-fiction; everyday texts; and media texts including newspapers, film and websites.
Students explore the relationship between the purpose and audience of texts and their structures and features, for example: sentence and paragraph structure, grammar, figurative language and organising structures in print texts; features of visual texts; and sound effects, characterisation and camera angles used in film. They develop their knowledge of how texts are constructed for particular purposes, and examine and challenge generalisations and simplistic portrayals of people and social and cultural issues. They learn how to draw evidence from texts to support their points of view. They experiment with several strategies when interpreting texts containing some unfamiliar ideas and information, for example, reading on, using diagrams, and differentiating between statements of fact or opinion.
Students write texts for a range of purposes that demonstrate their developing understanding of the way imagery, characterisation, dialogue, point of view, plot and setting contribute to the meaning of written and multimodal texts. They use this reflection, and their developing knowledge of the generic structures of different types of texts (such as narratives, reports and arguments), as the basis for composing an increasing range of written and spoken texts. Students become more systematic in their use of strategies for writing (including note-making, using models, planning, editing and proofreading) and make decisions about appropriate structures and features of language in texts for different purposes and audiences. They develop terminology or metalanguage to talk about and describe particular structures and features of language. They develop a multi-strategy approach to spelling, applying morphemic knowledge and an understanding of visual and phonic patterns, and select vocabulary for precise meaning.
Students engage in exploratory talk to share and clarify their ideas, to formulate simple arguments and to seek the opinions of others. They participate in oral interactions for different purposes, including entertaining, informing and influencing others. Students learn to sustain a point of view, and provide succinct accounts of personal experiences or events.
They experiment with spoken language features such as pace, pitch and pronunciation to enhance meaning as they plan, rehearse and reflect on their presentations. They build their capacity to combine verbal and visual elements in texts to communicate ideas and information by using, for example, presentation software or overheads.
When listening, students practise identifying the main idea and supporting details of spoken texts and summarising them for others. They begin to identify opinions offered by others, propose other viewpoints, and extend ideas in a constructive manner.

National Statements of Learning
This learning focus statement, in conjunction with aspects of the Communication Level 4 learning focus statement, incorporates aspects of the Year 5 National Statement of Learning for English.

Standards

Reading
At Level 4, students read, interpret and respond to a wide range of literary, everyday and media texts in print and in multimodal formats. They analyse these texts and support interpretations with evidence drawn from the text. They describe how texts are constructed for particular purposes, and identify how sociocultural values, attitudes and beliefs are presented in texts. They analyse imagery, characterisation, dialogue, point of view, plot and setting. They use strategies such as reading on, using contextual cues, and drawing on knowledge of text organisation when interpreting texts containing unfamiliar ideas and information.

Writing
At Level 4, students produce, in print and electronic forms, a variety of texts for different purposes using structures and features of language appropriate to the purpose, audience and context of the writing. They begin to use simple figurative language and visual images. They use a range of vocabulary, a variety of sentence structures, and use punctuation accurately, including apostrophes. They identify and use different parts of speech, including nouns, pronouns, adverbs, comparative adverbs and adjectives, and use appropriate prepositions and conjunctions. They use a range of approaches to spelling, applying morphemic knowledge and an understanding of visual and phonic patterns. They employ a variety of strategies for writing, including note-making, using models, planning, editing and proofreading.

Speaking and listening
At Level 4, students plan, rehearse and make presentations for different purposes. They sustain a point of view and provide succinct accounts of personal experiences or events. They adjust their speaking to take account of context, purpose and audience, and vary tone, volume and pace of speech to create or emphasise meaning.
When listening to spoken texts, they identify the main idea and supporting details and summarise them for others. They identify opinions offered by others, propose other relevant viewpoints and extend ideas in a constructive manner.

ICT for creating
At Level 4, students safely and independently use a range of skills, procedures, equipment and functions to process different data types and produce accurate and suitably formatted products to suit different purposes and audiences. They use design tools to represent how solutions will be produced and the layout of information products. Students select relevant techniques for minimising the time taken to process data, and apply conventions and techniques that improve the appearance of the finished product. Students modify products on an ongoing basis in order to improve meaning and judge their products against agreed criteria.
Students create and maintain an up-to-date, logically structured bank of digital evidence of their learning. They password protect and back up important files and use file naming conventions that allow easy retrieval.

ICT for communicating
At Level 4, students use email, websites and frequently asked question facilities to acquire from, or share information with, peers and known and unknown experts. When emailing, they successfully attach files and they apply protocols for sending and receiving electronic information. They successfully upload their work to a protected public online space. Using recommended search engines, students refine their search strategies to locate information quickly. They evaluate the integrity of the located information based on its accuracy and the reliability of the web host.





















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About your work with WEE Project:

The staff coordinators of this project are Lee King (ICT Specialist), Jen Dynan (Grade 2 Teacher) and Jacqueline Griffeth (Teacher Librarian).

Here is a link to our WEEwiki:
http://weemwps.wikispaces.com/

Our WEE wiki is for our students to record what they learn during the project as they start to create learning products for FUSE and SLAV.

Student reflections ......